Since before the Starbucks craze hit the nation, I’ve been baking scones for friends. Creating these finicky little treats seems to improve with a practiced hand. The basic rule of thumb is to handle the dough as little as possible once you incorporate the wet ingredients.

Scones come in sweet and savory varieties and use different wet substances. This post focuses only on sweet scones. Most of the recipes are not my own, but I use these recipes over and over, adjusting them to my tastes or what I happen to have in the pantry.

10. Blueberry Scones with Lemon Glaze – This is a Tyler Florence recipe and one of the best blueberry scone recipes out there. If you’ve been blueberry picking, try these instead of muffins for a change. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tyler-florence/blueberry-scones-with-lemon-glaze-recipe.html

Tip: Don’t skimp on the zest!

9. Fresh Raspberry Scones – You’ll find joyofbaking.com a few times in this list because it is my go-to site for scones. This scone uses yogurt as its wet ingredient. It is moist and delicious. I like white chocolate chips in this one as opposed to dark chocolate, but that is a personal choice! http://joyofbaking.com/RaspberryScones.html

Tip: Fresh raspberries are nearly impossible to work with. Be gentle and try not to mush them!

8. Maple Oat Scones – If you are hungry for scones but feeling guilty, these are your best bet. Using buttermilk instead of cream gives them a different texture. They are lower in fat and the oats make them seem healthier! Plus, maple syrup makes everything in life taste better! http://bakingbites.com/2011/09/maple-oat-scones/

Tip: No need to roll and flatten these out. Remember that the less you handle them, the more tender the result. Just drop them on your parchment paper and bake. I make them the size of golf balls.

7. Pumpkin Scones – It is difficult to find a pumpkin scone recipe that is not too dense or too moist. This recipe from Pinch My Salt was first published in 2007 and is the one I always go back to when fall rolls around. http://pinchmysalt.com/pumpkin-spice-scone-recipe/

Tip: I’ve tried both icings and prefer the molasses one myself.

6. Iced Gingerbread Scones – Like pumpkin scones, these are perfect over the holidays. I use this recipe for the base, but I like to mix confectioners sugar and maple syrup for the glaze. http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/12/iced-gingerbread-scones-recipe-christmas-breakfast.html

Tip: You can rewarm scones in the microwave the next day.

5. Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Scones – These are perhaps a bit too desserty for a scone, but you cannot go wrong with chocolate and peanut butter. They’re good, but the guilt factor is high when you’ve reached over to grab a second! http://www.browneyedbaker.com/oatmeal-peanut-butter-chocolate-chip-scones/

4. Glazed Heart Scones – Guys, if you like to bake, these scones make a lasting impression on your Valentine. I suggest you put this recipe aside and try it in February! http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/glazed-raspberry-heart-scones-231579

Tip: Don’t be a cheapskate. Buy seedless jam.

3. Cranberry Orange Cream Scones – Ina Garten bakes up a very nice scone with this recipe. I am not a huge fan of dried cranberries, so I always substitute dried cherries instead. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/cranberry-orange-scones-recipe.html

Tip: Remember the rule about handling your dough. That would include rolling and cutting. I press into a round disk and cut into pie wedges using a pizza cutter.

2. Pecan and Chocolate Chip Scones – Using the coffee house scone recipe as a base, very few scone recipes are as delicious as this one. The texture is the best thing about these scones. Stephanie’s method of dusting the top with powdered sugar then sticking them under the broiler to form a sweet crust makes them absolutely perfect right out of the oven. http://www.joyofbaking.com/SconesPecanChocolate.html

Tip: Watch these under the broiler like a hawk. And eat them soon after. Buttermilk scones do not hold as well as cream scones.

1. Cream Scone with Currants – This is my recipe. The one I use most often. Though the recipe calls for currents, you can substitute whatever you are in the mood for.

400 degrees
15-20 minutes

Ingredients:
2 cups flour (unsifted)
2 tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
2 Tbs sugar
1 stick butter (1/2 cup)
¼ cup your choice of add-ins (dried currents, chocolate chips, dried cherries, or whatever you prefer)
1 egg
½ cup heavy cream
jam

Directions:
In bowl mix flour, baking powder, salt, sugar. Cut in butter. (I use a pastry cutter and work with it until butter incorporated like small peas)

If you are adding any dried fruit or chocolate chips, do so now.

This is where a good scone is made or spoiled. You can work the flour and butter as much as you’d like before wet ingredients are added. Just as with biscuits, to keep them tender, you want to minimize messing with the dough once you add wet to dry.

In same measuring cup add egg to heavy cream and fork mix together. Gently fold into dry mixture.

Turn out onto baking sheet lined with parchment or baking mat. Using your hands, form into a ball and mush it down into a disk about 8 inches in diameter.

Brush top with a bit of heavy cream. Sprinkle with sugar. Cut into 8 sections with a pizza cutter.

At this point I often use a small round measuring spoon or a melon baller and make a small indent in the center of each scone and spoon in a small dollop of strawberry jam.

Bake until firm. Serve warm with jam.

I’ve added another to my list of favorite scones. Check out my recipe for cinnamon chip scones!

Enjoy!

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3 thoughts on “10 Scone Recipes to Try

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